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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 27, 2018 10:45pm-11:01pm BST

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withing, as nigel carry on. it is that thing, as nigel was saying, actually if you are building local capacity, you are building local capacity, you are building sustainability, it is that old crier, that old logo, if you like to trade not aid, because there isn't a lot of point in handing out for desperate need, but if you build something local, you keep it small, and that means that local people can begin to build their own businesses and africa, and africa is booming. it is the new development area, isn't it? and that is what we need to see and it is time there was a different relationship, instead of one of the generous benefactor. is i think this is very important. david cameron always gave the impression that the reason we were given foreign aid was out of the goodness of our hearts, basically a naturalistic thing, much better for this is how those, about actually benefiting britain. the danger in the past has been we have given foreign aid to the wrong places. it is notjust charities doing it
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improperly. it has been things like we have destroyed the textile business in one african country by insisting that our own people were running the foreign aid that took it over. so local people put out of work rather than brought into work. orsending work rather than brought into work. or sending out tractors where there was no fuel. that is interesting you say that, only in the last week mr trump, trump, mrtrump!! say that, only in the last week mr trump, trump, mr trump! : what you like. there has been a bit of a squabble with rwanda. they say they don't want the us‘s second—hand clothes because it is destroying their textile industry. exactly. but also the point that there is that huge question about china, is china still a developing countries, because they still receive huge amounts in aid, and yet they are invest in places like africa. that is the same with india. india has
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got a space programme. does it do foreign aid? one of the point of this, talking to a ministerfrom nigeria, we can do all this, we are ready to develop, we are falling down on infrastructure. let's just say these british businesses go to some of these african countries and the infrastructure is not there. is that going to grind to a halt in terms of investing? not necessarily, because if you then are in a partnership, but it is a much more equal partnership than the one of the charitable communicable we are going to give you this because you can't do it yourself, actually i know somebody who does an enormous amount of business across africa, and he told me dardai as he is now concentrating very much on this local capacity building, instead of the big projects, but also if you have big companies joining the big projects, but also if you have big companiesjoining together, you actually have got a slightly better way of monitoring, if you
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like, and safeguarding, whereas before you would give all this money and it would disappear and, funnily enough, that bridge didn't get built, it went to a fabulous... what people have to do now is make a business case for it. the answer is yes, you can do it, but there has to bea yes, you can do it, but there has to be a good business reason for doing it. let's turn to the independent, mr macron and brexit. the headline is macron refuses to rescue theresa may's checkers plan. well, it goes on and on, doesn't it? are we surprised about this? jo is certainly not. he is checkers or nothing. checkers is pretty unpopular. do you think they are at checkers made. very good. jacob rees—mogg has vowed to get rid of it. but there is nothing else on the table, we are seven months away from leaving, it is the best theresa
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may has got to offer, if this doesn't work, we end with no deal. now, if europe feels that, ok, that they are happy to live that too, theni they are happy to live that too, then i think that's where were going. it seems a pity to me. i mean it doesn't mean that checkers is actually set in stone, there are things you can actually do with it, but there were bits of it i found. what europe has been saying is we can't go and collect their customs duties for instance because we would bea duties for instance because we would be a third country after march. but we are heading increasingly towards ano we are heading increasingly towards a no deal. but what president macron has said is nothing other than what you would expect him to say, he was talking to the french diplomatic core and he said, we respect the sovereignty of the uk, we respect the decision of the uk to leave, but he vowed to protect the eu's integrity. well, you wouldn't really exciting to say anything else, would you? well, the reason i thought they
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might be a bit easier on theresa may is that if she loses checkers, it increases the likelihood she will fall. as far as i can gather neither -- afd. fall. as far as i can gather neither —— afd. so the idea of actually rejecting the whole thing out of hand seems to be one stage too far. identity has. he does seem to be saying he is not going to accept it. no, ithink saying he is not going to accept it. no, i think he is saying european unity must come first. yes, but this seems to be rejecting chequers. the whole thing is unravelling, according to the independent. that is the independent. come on. that also it is plugging its final say petition. shall we move on. yes, let's. high pollution levels causing
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a huge reduction in intelligence. this isn't new, is it? —— this it is not particularly new that it is quite damning evidence, a huge piece of research that has been conducted in china where obviously we know there is huge pollution. but it is very relevant for everywhere, because it does actually show that the effect on people, particularly the effect on people, particularly the elderly, is absolutely devastating. but what is really worrying and would be very worrying to parents, worrying and would be very worrying to pa rents, particularly worrying and would be very worrying to parents, particularly if they have got children growing up in cities, is that actually it works out that it is the loss of a year or more‘s education. now, you think of a little child in a pushchair being pushed along at sort of diesel fume level, and you think of that, you think of no fresh air. and this is the sort of thing that will put huge pressure on planners and local authorities and governments to
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introduce and maintain clean air, which again is another question for europe, what happens when we come out of europe? back to brexit again. that was for you, nigel! the one thing about something like this we ta ke thing about something like this we take it all the bit more seriously, that has to be a good thing. interesting that china carried out this piece of research. yes, it is quite big, 20,000 people, it is not huge, huge, huge, but if you think i7 huge, huge, huge, but if you think 17 million from the jaw deaths. how would you like to be paid, euros or sterling? this is linked to a story in the ft. answer the question! i would repair —— preferto in the ft. answer the question! i would repair —— prefer to be paid in the ft. answer the question! i would repair —— preferto be paid in stirling at the moment. i would actually, yes. this case it is the problem of the dollar, but this is to do with premiership footballers, imean to do with premiership footballers, i mean foreign premiership footballers, and they are terribly worried now about what is going to happen to sterling after brexit. and
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so happen to sterling after brexit. and so what the want to do is hedge their money. hedging, yeah. so for a fee with a currency trading firm, a fee with a currency trading firm, a fee of1.3%, fee with a currency trading firm, a fee of 1.3%, they can hedge a load of money, they are talking here about £100 million of currency from clients to make sure they are protected from a fall in the pound that will come after brexit.|j protected from a fall in the pound that will come after brexit. i have to say that although the story itself is relatively interesting, i do think this is a piece of let's just print the press release on behalf of a boutique trading company first which we won't mention! diaz, we won't, but manchester united, who have not had a particularly good evening but they are the world's wealthiest club in terms of revenue said new signings from overseas have begun to be asked to be paid in euros rather than sterling, but
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a p pa re ntly euros rather than sterling, but apparently they didn't have enough euros in hand. i don't know whether they keep them in the back office and the call—out, surely, got any euros tell? you are dealing with millions, aren't you? but it is interesting, we have a little bit more time, they have been hedging since 2016. yeah, and if you think about the number of non—eu players, foreign nationals from 65 countries, accounting for 70% of players in the premier league, that is a huge number. to that is an awful lot of money. so actually it is very good business, and if you think about sterling, which has fallen ili% against the euro since the brexit vote, that is a significant chunk, even on footballers wages. and actually i would like to be paid in diamonds like shirley bassey, rather than euros or sterling. and they are forever! thank you very much, you will be back with us just after
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11:30pm for our second edition of the papers. but for now, though, thatis the papers. but for now, though, that is it, don't forget, you can see that is it, don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — seven days a week — at bbc.co.uk/papers, and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you to my guests, nigel nelson and jo phillips, and we'll all be back with a longer review at 11.30pm. but goodbye for now. we had a fine and settled end to today, which was a much better day than what we had on sunday with all that rain around. for the week ahead, it looks like it will stay largely fine and settled, thanks to areas of high pressure. just a little bit of rain getting across the north—west corner of the country. that is the sunday circa
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pushing off into the neuer continent, ridge of high pressure building infor continent, ridge of high pressure building in for monday and as we had on into tonight, it will keep things fine and settled generally with light winds. doesn't necessarily mean clear skies, though, across the country. there will still be quite a bit of cloud around but where skies clear across southern england, we could see quite chilly one but across the north—west, quite a change if you are looking at the weather system moving in, cloud, breeze and outbreaks of rain as we head on into. elsewhere, a bright start, a little bit of sunshine around, variable cloud too, through the afternoon it will be pretty sober to how monday was afternoon with quite a bit of cloud, some sunny spells here and therefore stop that weather front will be bringing fichardt cloud to the northern isles and towards western scotland, fabrics of rain becoming more persistent, increasing breeze too, but ahead of it, easton and southern scotla nd but ahead of it, easton and southern scotland should stay bright. they've had a brightness in northern ireland, particularly eastern northern ireland before the rain sin, england and wales will see
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variable cloud and sunny spells, clearer skies moving to the channel islands, pushing into southern counties in england, some more sunshine here and topped averages around 21 of 22 degrees. that weather front continues to push in as we head into tuesday night but into wednesday this feature will be a dying one as it pushes into central part of the country, then we turn our attention to the south—east corner of the country, whether thundery low over the near continent could throw up a few showers or even a bit of uncertainty to the west, the extent of that, looks like it will clear off into the west. just a band of cloud with a few showers, quite heavy, and a fine day further north and west with light winds, although it will be breezy across western scotland. a little bit fresher across scotland and northern ireland but with high pressure building in towards the end of the week, it looks like it will be generally fine and dry with variable amounts of cloud and some sunny
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spells. this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11pm: the united nations says military leaders in myanmar should be investigated for genocide against the country's rohingya muslims. west midlands police name a man they want to speak to in connection with the murder of a mother and her daughter on the streets of solihull last night. food prices are expected to rise in the coming months as farmers feel the effects of this year's extreme weather. also, thousands of people join europe's biggest street festival on its second day. music and dancing came to a stop for 72 seconds at the notting hill carnival to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. and at 11:30pm, we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers jo phillips and nigel nelson. stay with us for that.
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